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Watering and Harvesting – get more from your plants

£ 15 
was

Buy now

*The information contained in this pack has been taken from Module 4 of my online course, Skills for Growing, so if you have purchased this course, or just Module 4, you will already have the information. For any queries, please email anna@charlesdowding.co.uk

Please note, this is a digital product and only accessible via the website. It is not downloadable.*

Watering

The watering section of this knowledge pack shows you amazing differences of growth, according to how, when, and how much you give water. If there is not enough water, plants can go into survival mode. They won’t die, but for vegetables this means smaller harvests.

If you water too much, and in the evening of damp days, diseases may appear. There are many aspects to watering well, and I help you to understand what approach could work in your situation.

Timings and frequency

How much to water is your call, and can be a fun skill to learn. Observe your plants carefully, and aim to give the amount appropriate for each vegetable, the weather, and the harvests you desire.

A base point is to water less often, though always giving enough water to soak the soil to a depth of, say, 5 cm / 2 in. The result is proportionately less evaporation from the surface.

Harvesting

There are many ways that you can harvest, using both tools and hands. I explain the most common methods, and how they influence subsequent growth. The more you harvest, the quicker and easier it becomes. Practise picking leaves and pulling roots, and learn the best way to use a knife.

Regrowth after harvest is always informative

I use certain vegetables as examples, in order to illustrate each method. You’ll see before and after photographs, to illustrate both the amount you can take and how this affects regrowth after a week or two.

My harvesting information is influenced by the desire for strong regrowth.

Harvesting methods

There are many types of vegetables and they all need different picking skills, to achieve regular harvests of high quality and preferred flavour. These skills will help you to grow more from less space, save time and suffer less pest damage.

Root vegetables are mostly easier to harvest than you might imagine, especially with no dig because the surface is soft as well as being firm. This may sound contradictory, but try it and see! Another factor in ease of harvest is that many root vegetables sit on the surface.

Knowledge pack contents – includes text, photos and video:

  • When and how to water, and how much
  • Harvesting methods, and amounts
  • Harvesting timings

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Watering and Harvesting – get more from your plants

More information

Further Description

*The information contained in this pack has been taken from Module 4 of my online course, Skills for Growing, so if you have purchased this course, or just Module 4, you will already have the information. For any queries, please email anna@charlesdowding.co.uk

Please note, this is a digital product and only accessible via the website. It is not downloadable.*

Watering

The watering section of this knowledge pack shows you amazing differences of growth, according to how, when, and how much you give water. If there is not enough water, plants can go into survival mode. They won’t die, but for vegetables this means smaller harvests.

If you water too much, and in the evening of damp days, diseases may appear. There are many aspects to watering well, and I help you to understand what approach could work in your situation.

Timings and frequency

How much to water is your call, and can be a fun skill to learn. Observe your plants carefully, and aim to give the amount appropriate for each vegetable, the weather, and the harvests you desire.

A base point is to water less often, though always giving enough water to soak the soil to a depth of, say, 5 cm / 2 in. The result is proportionately less evaporation from the surface.

Harvesting

There are many ways that you can harvest, using both tools and hands. I explain the most common methods, and how they influence subsequent growth. The more you harvest, the quicker and easier it becomes. Practise picking leaves and pulling roots, and learn the best way to use a knife.

Regrowth after harvest is always informative

I use certain vegetables as examples, in order to illustrate each method. You’ll see before and after photographs, to illustrate both the amount you can take and how this affects regrowth after a week or two.

My harvesting information is influenced by the desire for strong regrowth.

Harvesting methods

There are many types of vegetables and they all need different picking skills, to achieve regular harvests of high quality and preferred flavour. These skills will help you to grow more from less space, save time and suffer less pest damage.

Root vegetables are mostly easier to harvest than you might imagine, especially with no dig because the surface is soft as well as being firm. This may sound contradictory, but try it and see! Another factor in ease of harvest is that many root vegetables sit on the surface.

Knowledge pack contents – includes text, photos and video:

  • When and how to water, and how much
  • Harvesting methods, and amounts
  • Harvesting timings

*The information contained in this pack has been taken from Module 4 of my online course, Skills for Growing, so if you have purchased this course, or just Module 4, you will already have the information. For any queries, please email anna@charlesdowding.co.uk

Please note, this is a digital product and only accessible via the website. It is not downloadable.*

Watering

The watering section of this knowledge pack shows you amazing differences of growth, according to how, when, and how much you give water. If there is not enough water, plants can go into survival mode. They won’t die, but for vegetables this means smaller harvests.

If you water too much, and in the evening of damp days, diseases may appear. There are many aspects to watering well, and I help you to understand what approach could work in your situation.

Timings and frequency

How much to water is your call, and can be a fun skill to learn. Observe your plants carefully, and aim to give the amount appropriate for each vegetable, the weather, and the harvests you desire.

A base point is to water less often, though always giving enough water to soak the soil to a depth of, say, 5 cm / 2 in. The result is proportionately less evaporation from the surface.

Harvesting

There are many ways that you can harvest, using both tools and hands. I explain the most common methods, and how they influence subsequent growth. The more you harvest, the quicker and easier it becomes. Practise picking leaves and pulling roots, and learn the best way to use a knife.

Regrowth after harvest is always informative

I use certain vegetables as examples, in order to illustrate each method. You’ll see before and after photographs, to illustrate both the amount you can take and how this affects regrowth after a week or two.

My harvesting information is influenced by the desire for strong regrowth.

Harvesting methods

There are many types of vegetables and they all need different picking skills, to achieve regular harvests of high quality and preferred flavour. These skills will help you to grow more from less space, save time and suffer less pest damage.

Root vegetables are mostly easier to harvest than you might imagine, especially with no dig because the surface is soft as well as being firm. This may sound contradictory, but try it and see! Another factor in ease of harvest is that many root vegetables sit on the surface.

Knowledge pack contents – includes text, photos and video:

  • When and how to water, and how much
  • Harvesting methods, and amounts
  • Harvesting timings
£ 15 
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Watering and Harvesting – get more from your plants

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Further Description

*The information contained in this pack has been taken from Module 4 of my online course, Skills for Growing, so if you have purchased this course, or just Module 4, you will already have the information. For any queries, please email anna@charlesdowding.co.uk

Please note, this is a digital product and only accessible via the website. It is not downloadable.*

Watering

The watering section of this knowledge pack shows you amazing differences of growth, according to how, when, and how much you give water. If there is not enough water, plants can go into survival mode. They won’t die, but for vegetables this means smaller harvests.

If you water too much, and in the evening of damp days, diseases may appear. There are many aspects to watering well, and I help you to understand what approach could work in your situation.

Timings and frequency

How much to water is your call, and can be a fun skill to learn. Observe your plants carefully, and aim to give the amount appropriate for each vegetable, the weather, and the harvests you desire.

A base point is to water less often, though always giving enough water to soak the soil to a depth of, say, 5 cm / 2 in. The result is proportionately less evaporation from the surface.

Harvesting

There are many ways that you can harvest, using both tools and hands. I explain the most common methods, and how they influence subsequent growth. The more you harvest, the quicker and easier it becomes. Practise picking leaves and pulling roots, and learn the best way to use a knife.

Regrowth after harvest is always informative

I use certain vegetables as examples, in order to illustrate each method. You’ll see before and after photographs, to illustrate both the amount you can take and how this affects regrowth after a week or two.

My harvesting information is influenced by the desire for strong regrowth.

Harvesting methods

There are many types of vegetables and they all need different picking skills, to achieve regular harvests of high quality and preferred flavour. These skills will help you to grow more from less space, save time and suffer less pest damage.

Root vegetables are mostly easier to harvest than you might imagine, especially with no dig because the surface is soft as well as being firm. This may sound contradictory, but try it and see! Another factor in ease of harvest is that many root vegetables sit on the surface.

Knowledge pack contents – includes text, photos and video:

  • When and how to water, and how much
  • Harvesting methods, and amounts
  • Harvesting timings

Watering and Harvesting – get more from your plants

£ 15 
Buy now

*The information contained in this pack has been taken from Module 4 of my online course, Skills for Growing, so if you have purchased this course, or just Module 4, you will already have the information. For any queries, please email anna@charlesdowding.co.uk

Please note, this is a digital product and only accessible via the website. It is not downloadable.*

Watering

The watering section of this knowledge pack shows you amazing differences of growth, according to how, when, and how much you give water. If there is not enough water, plants can go into survival mode. They won’t die, but for vegetables this means smaller harvests.

If you water too much, and in the evening of damp days, diseases may appear. There are many aspects to watering well, and I help you to understand what approach could work in your situation.

Timings and frequency

How much to water is your call, and can be a fun skill to learn. Observe your plants carefully, and aim to give the amount appropriate for each vegetable, the weather, and the harvests you desire.

A base point is to water less often, though always giving enough water to soak the soil to a depth of, say, 5 cm / 2 in. The result is proportionately less evaporation from the surface.

Harvesting

There are many ways that you can harvest, using both tools and hands. I explain the most common methods, and how they influence subsequent growth. The more you harvest, the quicker and easier it becomes. Practise picking leaves and pulling roots, and learn the best way to use a knife.

Regrowth after harvest is always informative

I use certain vegetables as examples, in order to illustrate each method. You’ll see before and after photographs, to illustrate both the amount you can take and how this affects regrowth after a week or two.

My harvesting information is influenced by the desire for strong regrowth.

Harvesting methods

There are many types of vegetables and they all need different picking skills, to achieve regular harvests of high quality and preferred flavour. These skills will help you to grow more from less space, save time and suffer less pest damage.

Root vegetables are mostly easier to harvest than you might imagine, especially with no dig because the surface is soft as well as being firm. This may sound contradictory, but try it and see! Another factor in ease of harvest is that many root vegetables sit on the surface.

Knowledge pack contents – includes text, photos and video:

  • When and how to water, and how much
  • Harvesting methods, and amounts
  • Harvesting timings

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat.