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Spacing – why it’s important

£ 15 
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*The information contained in this pack has been taken from Module 3 of my online course, Skills for Growing, so if you have purchased this course, or just Module 3, you will already have the information. For any queries, please email anna@charlesdowding.co.uk

Please note, this is a digital product and only accessible via the website. It is not downloadable.*

This knowledge pack explains why spacing is important. Plants grow quite differently, whether close or further away from their neighbours. Much as plants need space to grow to their full potential, they also do not start well in wide open spaces.

Each vegetable has a potential best spacing, at which it can grow to a decent, but not excessive size. It will find sufficient nutrients and moisture, and harvests will be even and regular.

Close spacings

I explain how close spacing can be a form of companion planting. Small seedlings, especially, do not thrive when there are wide distances to their closest neighbours. Plants are like people and companion planting actually means, literally, companionship.

Having said that, if you space vegetables too close, much as they will grow, the harvest might not be what you are wanting. Or they may be difficult to pick from – with lettuce, for example, you may not be able get your hands around each plant to remove the outer leaves.

Proximity can also result in more diseases, such as mildew, because leave stay damp for longer. There is less air circulating around each plant. And another downside of spacing too closely can be difficulty of weeding, if there are many weed seeds germinating.

Growth changes with spacing

You’ll learn how the space between plants affects how quickly they start cropping, as well as how big they grow.

You can vary spacings according to desired results. For example, if you want baby carrots, or small lettuce leaves for a quick harvest by cutting, then space closely. If you want larger carrots, and longer lived lettuce plants, give them more room.

Try some different spacings and not just the ones suggested on seed packets. I explain this with all common vegetables.

Close spacings are fun and can give higher yields. They are easier with no dig because of lower weed pressure. Try my suggestions, to see how much food you can harvest from small areas.

Knowledge pack contents – includes text, photos and video:

  • The how and why of spacing
  • Examples of close spacings
  • Examples of wider spacings
  • Spacing Guide (downloadable PDF)

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Spacing – why it’s important

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Further Description

*The information contained in this pack has been taken from Module 3 of my online course, Skills for Growing, so if you have purchased this course, or just Module 3, you will already have the information. For any queries, please email anna@charlesdowding.co.uk

Please note, this is a digital product and only accessible via the website. It is not downloadable.*

This knowledge pack explains why spacing is important. Plants grow quite differently, whether close or further away from their neighbours. Much as plants need space to grow to their full potential, they also do not start well in wide open spaces.

Each vegetable has a potential best spacing, at which it can grow to a decent, but not excessive size. It will find sufficient nutrients and moisture, and harvests will be even and regular.

Close spacings

I explain how close spacing can be a form of companion planting. Small seedlings, especially, do not thrive when there are wide distances to their closest neighbours. Plants are like people and companion planting actually means, literally, companionship.

Having said that, if you space vegetables too close, much as they will grow, the harvest might not be what you are wanting. Or they may be difficult to pick from – with lettuce, for example, you may not be able get your hands around each plant to remove the outer leaves.

Proximity can also result in more diseases, such as mildew, because leave stay damp for longer. There is less air circulating around each plant. And another downside of spacing too closely can be difficulty of weeding, if there are many weed seeds germinating.

Growth changes with spacing

You’ll learn how the space between plants affects how quickly they start cropping, as well as how big they grow.

You can vary spacings according to desired results. For example, if you want baby carrots, or small lettuce leaves for a quick harvest by cutting, then space closely. If you want larger carrots, and longer lived lettuce plants, give them more room.

Try some different spacings and not just the ones suggested on seed packets. I explain this with all common vegetables.

Close spacings are fun and can give higher yields. They are easier with no dig because of lower weed pressure. Try my suggestions, to see how much food you can harvest from small areas.

Knowledge pack contents – includes text, photos and video:

  • The how and why of spacing
  • Examples of close spacings
  • Examples of wider spacings
  • Spacing Guide (downloadable PDF)

*The information contained in this pack has been taken from Module 3 of my online course, Skills for Growing, so if you have purchased this course, or just Module 3, you will already have the information. For any queries, please email anna@charlesdowding.co.uk

Please note, this is a digital product and only accessible via the website. It is not downloadable.*

This knowledge pack explains why spacing is important. Plants grow quite differently, whether close or further away from their neighbours. Much as plants need space to grow to their full potential, they also do not start well in wide open spaces.

Each vegetable has a potential best spacing, at which it can grow to a decent, but not excessive size. It will find sufficient nutrients and moisture, and harvests will be even and regular.

Close spacings

I explain how close spacing can be a form of companion planting. Small seedlings, especially, do not thrive when there are wide distances to their closest neighbours. Plants are like people and companion planting actually means, literally, companionship.

Having said that, if you space vegetables too close, much as they will grow, the harvest might not be what you are wanting. Or they may be difficult to pick from – with lettuce, for example, you may not be able get your hands around each plant to remove the outer leaves.

Proximity can also result in more diseases, such as mildew, because leave stay damp for longer. There is less air circulating around each plant. And another downside of spacing too closely can be difficulty of weeding, if there are many weed seeds germinating.

Growth changes with spacing

You’ll learn how the space between plants affects how quickly they start cropping, as well as how big they grow.

You can vary spacings according to desired results. For example, if you want baby carrots, or small lettuce leaves for a quick harvest by cutting, then space closely. If you want larger carrots, and longer lived lettuce plants, give them more room.

Try some different spacings and not just the ones suggested on seed packets. I explain this with all common vegetables.

Close spacings are fun and can give higher yields. They are easier with no dig because of lower weed pressure. Try my suggestions, to see how much food you can harvest from small areas.

Knowledge pack contents – includes text, photos and video:

  • The how and why of spacing
  • Examples of close spacings
  • Examples of wider spacings
  • Spacing Guide (downloadable PDF)
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Spacing – why it’s important

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Further Description

*The information contained in this pack has been taken from Module 3 of my online course, Skills for Growing, so if you have purchased this course, or just Module 3, you will already have the information. For any queries, please email anna@charlesdowding.co.uk

Please note, this is a digital product and only accessible via the website. It is not downloadable.*

This knowledge pack explains why spacing is important. Plants grow quite differently, whether close or further away from their neighbours. Much as plants need space to grow to their full potential, they also do not start well in wide open spaces.

Each vegetable has a potential best spacing, at which it can grow to a decent, but not excessive size. It will find sufficient nutrients and moisture, and harvests will be even and regular.

Close spacings

I explain how close spacing can be a form of companion planting. Small seedlings, especially, do not thrive when there are wide distances to their closest neighbours. Plants are like people and companion planting actually means, literally, companionship.

Having said that, if you space vegetables too close, much as they will grow, the harvest might not be what you are wanting. Or they may be difficult to pick from – with lettuce, for example, you may not be able get your hands around each plant to remove the outer leaves.

Proximity can also result in more diseases, such as mildew, because leave stay damp for longer. There is less air circulating around each plant. And another downside of spacing too closely can be difficulty of weeding, if there are many weed seeds germinating.

Growth changes with spacing

You’ll learn how the space between plants affects how quickly they start cropping, as well as how big they grow.

You can vary spacings according to desired results. For example, if you want baby carrots, or small lettuce leaves for a quick harvest by cutting, then space closely. If you want larger carrots, and longer lived lettuce plants, give them more room.

Try some different spacings and not just the ones suggested on seed packets. I explain this with all common vegetables.

Close spacings are fun and can give higher yields. They are easier with no dig because of lower weed pressure. Try my suggestions, to see how much food you can harvest from small areas.

Knowledge pack contents – includes text, photos and video:

  • The how and why of spacing
  • Examples of close spacings
  • Examples of wider spacings
  • Spacing Guide (downloadable PDF)

Spacing – why it’s important

£ 15 
Buy now

*The information contained in this pack has been taken from Module 3 of my online course, Skills for Growing, so if you have purchased this course, or just Module 3, you will already have the information. For any queries, please email anna@charlesdowding.co.uk

Please note, this is a digital product and only accessible via the website. It is not downloadable.*

This knowledge pack explains why spacing is important. Plants grow quite differently, whether close or further away from their neighbours. Much as plants need space to grow to their full potential, they also do not start well in wide open spaces.

Each vegetable has a potential best spacing, at which it can grow to a decent, but not excessive size. It will find sufficient nutrients and moisture, and harvests will be even and regular.

Close spacings

I explain how close spacing can be a form of companion planting. Small seedlings, especially, do not thrive when there are wide distances to their closest neighbours. Plants are like people and companion planting actually means, literally, companionship.

Having said that, if you space vegetables too close, much as they will grow, the harvest might not be what you are wanting. Or they may be difficult to pick from – with lettuce, for example, you may not be able get your hands around each plant to remove the outer leaves.

Proximity can also result in more diseases, such as mildew, because leave stay damp for longer. There is less air circulating around each plant. And another downside of spacing too closely can be difficulty of weeding, if there are many weed seeds germinating.

Growth changes with spacing

You’ll learn how the space between plants affects how quickly they start cropping, as well as how big they grow.

You can vary spacings according to desired results. For example, if you want baby carrots, or small lettuce leaves for a quick harvest by cutting, then space closely. If you want larger carrots, and longer lived lettuce plants, give them more room.

Try some different spacings and not just the ones suggested on seed packets. I explain this with all common vegetables.

Close spacings are fun and can give higher yields. They are easier with no dig because of lower weed pressure. Try my suggestions, to see how much food you can harvest from small areas.

Knowledge pack contents – includes text, photos and video:

  • The how and why of spacing
  • Examples of close spacings
  • Examples of wider spacings
  • Spacing Guide (downloadable PDF)

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat.