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June 15, 2023
Late June 2023, so dry and no dig is helping!

Late June, often the weather changes around this time of solstice. I hope so, after five weeks without rain for most of us. Find more details in my recent newsletter, do subscribe if you have not already.

Nonetheless, temperatures will stay warm, including at night. This helps growth to continue if roots can access moisture. That is the limiting factor for many of us.

If you can, keep watering these vegetables that need it most, see my short video. It’s best to continue watering as though no rain is forecast, because sometimes it does not happen and your plants suffer. But if it then does rain, moisture is pushed further down. A reserve for the coming weeks. You can even water when it”s raining, to good effect.

Lettuce seedlings surviving bright sunlight and 35C heat! It's a myth that they don't, but I water twice daily.
Lettuce seedlings surviving bright sunlight and 35C heat! It’s a myth that they don’t, but I water twice daily.
Watering lettuce two cans in bright sunlight. You can!!!
Watering lettuce two cans in bright sunlight. You can!!!
Watering new cabbages through mesh is quicker than removing the cover. I transplanted these five days earlier, they were in the small pots.
Watering new cabbages through mesh is quicker than removing the cover. I transplanted these five days earlier, they were in the small pots.

Second plantings

Dry weather can make this more difficult, however do whatever you can to keep bed is full. In order to have harvest in autumn and through winter. See this recent video.

The photos give you some examples and ideas. This coming week we shall be sowing more carrots between lettuce, and planting kale between onions. Watering the new plantings benefits the existing vegetables, or vice versa.

See also my Knowledge pack about watering and harvesting.

Kale, cabbage and Brussels sprouts plants potted on. Sown in trays 4th May, pticked to modules, potted on two weeks ago.
Kale, cabbage and Brussels sprouts plants potted on. Sown in trays 4th May, pticked to modules, potted on two weeks ago.
Brussels sprouts interplanted between carrots 11th June, watered through mesh which protects them both
Brussels sprouts interplanted between carrots 11th June, watered through mesh which protects them both
View middle of the main garden middle of June. Trial beds in front have potatoes to harvest soon and I follow them with leeks, while the onions will soon have kale between
View middle of the main garden middle of June. Trial beds in front have potatoes to harvest soon and I follow them with leeks, while the onions will soon have kale between

Problems?

Always more than I can mention – the photos give you an idea and I hope to reassure you! The garlic is not a total disaster and you can learn more about the benefits of growing it under cover in this video.

Aphids since April have been shockingly numerous and there are many fewer predators than normal. I’m only now seeing the first serious number of ladybird larvae. What is going on?

This link is for veggiemesh covers to keep insects off.

My tomato plants in the polytunnel are rolling their leaves, and this is not anything to do with a lack of moisture. Rather it's from big variations in night and day temperatures. More ventilation would help, but the cucumbers and melons are doing fine.
My tomato plants in the polytunnel are rolling their leaves, and this is not anything to do with a lack of moisture. Rather it’s from big variations in night and day temperatures. More ventilation would help, but the cucumbers and melons are doing fine.
This rusty garlic is just a few days before harvest. There is still green in the middle!
This rusty garlic is just a few days before harvest. There is still green in the middle!
It's an aphid season, and the black flies on broad beans are far more then usual
It’s an aphid season, and the black flies on broad beans are far more then usual

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