Organic Seeds vs Non-Organic Seeds


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This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  John 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #45393

    Perry
    Participant

    I like to grow in the most ‘organic’ way I possibly can, that is I don’t buy any products to stimulate growth or kill pests/ disease etc. I notice many seeds now come with organic certification and a 20% price hike, and wonder if this is really anything more than a marketing gimmick? After all, how much of the seed’s ‘non-organic’ makeup will go into the ‘fruit’ it bears if no chemicals are used on it or in the soil it is grown in?

    #45396

    charles
    Moderator

    Hi Perry, interesting question which implicitly raises the question of seed cost, in proportion to the value of produce.
    In my experience seed costs little, relative to what one harvests, so I am happy to pay more for high quality, fresh and if possible organic seed, though sadly this is not always possible.
    Why pay 20% more or whatever the difference is? Because the seed comes from a plant grown in a healthier environment and has more chance from that of showing good vigour and perhaps disease resistance.
    Plus you are supporting organic farming somewhere else.

    #45399

    Perry
    Participant

    Good point Charles, I’m very happy to support organic farmers and pay extra for their produce so that should apply to seeds too. In fairness I do opt for organic seeds where possible, and this year I also have a rich selection of swapped and saved seeds which are (so far!) performing outstandingly. I was thinking more about whether it makes any difference to the plants, and you have provided a compelling argument for saying it does. Upon reflection, it makes even more sense to buy organic seeds that may be slightly better adapted to the growing conditions of organically raised plants.

    #45400

    Stringfellow
    Participant

    Or save your own Perry, if you have yet to try it. Pea, broadbean and lettuce make a good first year project of saving your own and, generally speaking, they seem to be more vigorous than bought seed. Garlic is another straight forward one and beans for drying provide food and next years seed; it’s time that’s in short supply though, so I will still purchase a lot of seed.

    #45443

    Perry
    Participant

    Thanks Stringfellow, I do save seed and have been pleasantly surprised to see how well it does compared to purchased seed, but there’s always something new to try!

    I’m on my 2nd year in plot I only started last year, I hadn’t heard about no-dig until recently and being new to ‘serious’ gardening I’m so pleased I have come across this method of growing. There is much to learn, but nice not to have a lot to un-learn too.

    Can anyone suggest what to do with this onion that has sprouted? Should it be planted out like garlic?

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    #45449

    John
    Participant

    Hello, I use certified organic seed and conventional seed (not certified but not guaranteed). I have noticed that organic seed is the stronger of the two. I have used hybrids occasionally. I fed the produce from saved seed to a horse. He liked them. I don’t practice “no dig” but I am using alot of advice from Charles YouTube films. More so with composting. Plus multi sown modules…very impressive. Just to introduce myself, my name is John Devereaux, I am Irish. I studied once upon a time…Food Science graduate and postgraduate in another food (culinary) topic. Regarding organic seeds, they strive.

    #45450

    Cleansweep
    Participant

    Its difficult to identify from a photo; its probably going to bolt(flower) as its overwintered. There would be some benefit to pot it up and then use the leafshoots as scallions before your spring onions are ready-April?
    Against the possibility that its realy a shallot or clumping onion, you could plant it out.Presumably you know its source, which may determine.
    If you’ve small people, they may enjoy growing it over a jamjar of water, seeing its roots and shoots develop.

    #45458

    charles
    Moderator

    Perry, I would eat that onion soon, it’s on the way to seeding, after making edible leaves.
    Onions are storage organs to feed new growth in spring and then a seedhead in summer.

    Nice to meet you here John, thanks for your comments.

    #45477

    John
    Participant

    Hello Charles and thank you. Above anything, your composting philosophy wins. I compost here and for several years, I have one specific heap made 90 percent if not more of just lawn mowed grass…other piles have mixed materials, straw etc.

    #45479

    John
    Participant

    Good question about non organic chemical carry over in the conventional seeds make up. Phew, I assume it is carried over into the genetic make up of the plant. The chemicals are added for many purposes, needless to say to alter the seeds susceptibility to a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. If the seed just simply breaks dormancy because if miisture, warmth, air and nutrients…then question the impact of chemical treatments on the seeds metabolism ?!. I will read up on that myself.

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