Best way of storing seeds to maintain high germination frequency over years?


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This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Vinther 8 hours, 59 minutes ago.

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  • #49954

    Vinther
    Participant

    hello,

    I only produce self saved seeds from (open pollinated) peas, beans, tomatoes, pebers etc. – all that can be taken form the plants mature fruits. These can be renewed every year, and the germination frequency is usually high after a single year. Seeds I buy usually contains a lot more seeds then I can use up in a single season, so I’m wondering what is the best way of storing seeds to preserve the highest possible germination frequency over years? I keep mine in a closed plastic box in the deep freezer, but is that the best option?

    regards
    Erik

    #49961

    charles
    Moderator

    That is a good option Erik, although do make sure your box has dry air. Some silica gel will help.

    #49969

    Vinther
    Participant

    Thanks Charles

    #50013

    Christine
    Participant

    I bought lots of seeds last spring as I wanted to try to grow a little of everything to feed the family. I had the idea that seeds would last forever. Since reading this I have realised (another) of my mistakes. Nest spring should I just broadcast sow every seed I have left then transplant whatever germinates? Not the carrots and parsnips obviously.
    I also have onion sets stored in a dark dry metal box I suppose there is no hope for these.

    #50015

    Vinther
    Participant

    Hi Christine,
    If your onion sets are stored in a dry and cool’ish environment, they are good to go for the spring. I haven’t any experience in storing onion sets for more then one season. Regarding your seeds, the germination frequence will always drop over time, and it’s not that it will drop to 0% in one year if stored at room temperature. I’m not and expert, but i think low humidity is more important then temperature. As Charles shows in his videos, broad sowing and subsequent pricking of the seedlings into plugg cells is a very good idea in any case. It’s a very space saving and efficient way of raising plants. I think there are exception like beans and peas, which i don’t think is suitable for pricking. However, Charles are showing us that so many ‘old teachings’ and dogmas just doesn’t hold true or doesn’t apply to no-dig gardening, so he may have another opinion 🙂

    regards
    Erik

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